Occultations of astrophysical radio sources as probes of planetary environments: A case study of Jupiter and possible applications to exoplanets [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07075


Properties of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres are difficult to measure from Earth. Radio occultations are a common method for measuring these properties, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. Here we explore whether occultations of radio emissions from a distant astrophysical radio source can be used to measure magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density around planets. In a theoretical case study of Jupiter, we find that significant changes in polarization angle due to Faraday rotation occur for radio signals that pass within 10 Jupiter radii of the planet and that significant changes in frequency and power occur from radio signals that pass through the neutral atmosphere. There are sufficient candidate radio sources, such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers, that occultations are likely to occur at least once per year. For pulsars, time delays in the arrival of their emitted pulses can be used to measure plasma density. Exoplanets, whose physical properties are very challenging to observe, may also occult distant astrophysical radio sources, such as their parent stars.

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P. Withers and M. Vogt
Fri, 24 Feb 17
3/50

Comments: Published in ApJ on 13 February 2017 – this http URL

OSIRIS-REx: Sample Return from Asteroid (101955) Bennu [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.06981


In May of 2011, NASA selected the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) asteroid sample return mission as the third mission in the New Frontiers program. The other two New Frontiers missions are New Horizons, which explored Pluto during a flyby in July 2015 and is on its way for a flyby of Kuiper Belt object 2014 MU69 on Jan. 1, 2019, and Juno, an orbiting mission that is studying the origin, evolution, and internal structure of Jupiter. The spacecraft departed for near-Earth asteroid (101955) Bennu aboard an United Launch Alliance Atlas V 411 evolved expendable launch vehicle at 7:05 p.m. EDT on September 8, 2016, on a seven-year journey to return samples from Bennu. The spacecraft is on an outbound-cruise trajectory that will result in a rendezvous with Bennu in August 2018. The science instruments on the spacecraft will survey Bennu to measure its physical, geological, and chemical properties, and the team will use these data to select a site on the surface to collect at least 60 g of asteroid regolith. The team will also analyze the remote-sensing data to perform a detailed study of the sample site for context, assess Bennus resource potential, refine estimates of its impact probability with Earth, and provide ground-truth data for the extensive astronomical data set collected on this asteroid. The spacecraft will leave Bennu in 2021 and return the sample to the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) on September 24, 2023.

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D. Lauretta, S. Balram-Knutson, E. Beshore, et. al.
Fri, 24 Feb 17
8/50

Comments: 89 pages, 39 figures, submitted to Space Science Reviews – OSIRIS-REx special issue

Reconnaissance of the TRAPPIST-1 exoplanet system in the Lyman-$α$ line [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07004


The TRAPPIST-1 system offers the opportunity to characterize terrestrial, potentially habitable planets orbiting a nearby ultracool dwarf star. We performed a four-orbit reconnaissance with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope to study the stellar emission at Lyman-$\alpha$, to assess the presence of hydrogen exospheres around the two inner planets, and to determine their UV irradiation. We detect the Lyman-$\alpha$ line of TRAPPIST-1, making it the coldest exoplanet host star for which this line has been measured. We reconstruct the intrinsic line profile, showing that it lacks broad wings and is much fainter than expected from the stellar X-ray emission. TRAPPIST-1 has a similar X-ray emission as Proxima Cen but a much lower Ly-$\alpha$ emission. This suggests that TRAPPIST-1 chromosphere is only moderately active compared to its transition region and corona. We estimated the atmospheric mass loss rates for all planets, and found that despite a moderate extreme UV emission the total XUV irradiation could be strong enough to strip the atmospheres of the inner planets in a few billions years. We detect marginal flux decreases at the times of TRAPPIST-1b and c transits, which might originate from stellar activity, but could also hint at the presence of extended hydrogen exospheres. Understanding the origin of these Lyman-$\alpha$ variations will be crucial in assessing the atmospheric stability and potential habitability of the TRAPPIST-1 planets.

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V. Bourrier, D. Ehrenreich, P. Wheatley, et. al.
Fri, 24 Feb 17
15/50

Comments: Published in A&A as a Letter to the Editor

Triaxial Deformation and Asynchronous Rotation of Rocky Planets in the Habitable Zone of Low-Mass Stars [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07327


Rocky planets orbiting M-dwarf stars in the habitable zone tend to be driven to synchronous rotation by tidal dissipation, potentially causing difficulties for maintaining a habitable climate on the planet. However, the planet may be captured into asynchronous spin-orbit resonances if it has sufficiently large intrinsic triaxial deformation. We derive the analytic expression for the maximum triaxiality of a rocky planet, with and without a liquid envelope, as a function of the planet’s radius, density, rigidity and critical strain of fracture. The derived maximum triaxiality is consistent with the observed triaxialities for terrestrial planets in the solar system, and indicates that rocky planets in the habitable zone of M-dwarfs can in principle be in a state of asynchronous spin-orbit resonances.

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J. Zanazzi and D. Lai
Fri, 24 Feb 17
20/50

Comments: 7 pages, 3 figures, submitted to MNRAS

Visco-rotational shear instability of Keplerian granular flows [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07271


We present the linear rheological instability triggered by the interplay of the shear rheology and Keplerian differential rotation of incompressible dense granular fluids. Instability sets in granular fluids, where the viscosity parameter grows faster than the square of the local shear rate (strain rate) at constant pressure. Found instability can play a crucial role in the formation of observed structures in planetary rings, as well as promote structure formation in protoplanetary disks dense granular material.

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L. Poniatowski and A. Tevzadze
Fri, 24 Feb 17
38/50

Comments: 5 pages, 3 figures. Comments welcome

The Equilibrium Temperature of Planets in Elliptical Orbits [EPA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.07314


There exists a positive correlation between orbital eccentricity and the average stellar flux that planets receive from their parent star. Often, though, it is assumed that the average equilibrium temperature would correspondingly increase with eccentricity. Here we test this assumption by calculating and comparing analytic solutions for both the spatial and temporal averages of orbital distance, stellar flux, and equilibrium temperature. Our solutions show that the average equilibrium temperature of a planet, with a constant albedo, slowly decreases with eccentricity until converging to a value 90% that of a circular orbit. This might be the case for many types of planets (e.g., hot-jupiters); however, the actual equilibrium and surface temperature of planets also depend on orbital variations of albedo and greenhouse. Our results also have implications in understanding the climate, habitability and the occurrence of potential Earth-like planets. For instance, it helps explain why the limits of the habitable zone for planets in highly elliptical orbits are wider than expected from the mean flux approximation, as shown by climate models.

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A. Mendez and E. Rivera-Valentin
Fri, 24 Feb 17
50/50

Comments: 13 pages, 3 figures, 2 tables. ApJL, 837, L1

Trace hydrogen in helium atmosphere white dwarfs as a possible signature of water accretion [SSA]

http://arxiv.org/abs/1702.06542


A handful of white dwarfs with helium-dominated atmospheres contain exceptionally large masses of hydrogen in their convection zones, with the metal-polluted white dwarf GD 16 being one of the earliest recognised examples. We report the discovery of a similar star: the white dwarf coincidentally named GD 17. We obtained medium-resolution spectroscopy of both GD 16 and GD 17 and calculated abundances and accretion rates of photospheric H, Mg, Ca, Ti, Fe and Ni. The metal abundance ratios indicate that the two stars recently accreted debris which is Mg-poor compared to the composition of bulk Earth. However, unlike the metal pollutants, H never diffuses out of the atmosphere of white dwarfs and we propose that the exceptionally high atmospheric H content of GD 16 and GD 17 ($2.2\times 10^{24}$g and $2.9\times 10^{24}$g respectively) could result from previous accretion of water bearing planetesimals. Comparing the detection of trace H and metal pollution among 729 helium atmosphere white dwarfs, we find that the presence of H is nearly twice as common in metal-polluted white dwarfs compared to their metal-free counterparts. This highly significant correlation indicates that, over the cooling age of the white dwarfs, at least some fraction of the H detected in many He atmospheres (including GD 16 and GD 17) is accreted alongside metal pollutants, where the most plausible source is water. In this scenario, water must be common in systems with rocky planetesimals.

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N. Fusillo, B. Gansicke, J. Farihi, et. al.
Thu, 23 Feb 17
8/48

Comments: 10 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS